Dipper Adult
Fact File
Taken at Banton Loch on 27th December 2015 using Nikon D5200
with Sigma 150-500 mm zoom lens.




 

Taken at Durness on 2nd October 2015 using Nikon D5200
with Sigma 150-500 mm zoom lens.
Fact File
Taken at Fairlie on 28th February 2015 using Nikon D5200
with Sigma 150-500
mm zoom lens.
Fact File
Taken at Strathaven on 29th September 2015 using Nikon D5200
with Sigma 150-500 mm zoom lens.
Fact File
Juveniles
Taken at
Durness on 7th July 2014 using Nikon D5200 with Sigma 150-500 mm zoom lens.
Fact File
 
Dipper
Species:
Order:
Family:
Local Names:
Cinclus cinclus.
Passeriformes.
Cinclidae.

Site Of Nest:
Materials:




Food:

Feature:








Plumage:
Length:
Breeding Period:
Eggs:
By the water.
Moss, dead grass and leaves.The visible nest however,
is just a shelter. Usually hidden beneath a lip, is the entrance
to the real nest within, a cup of grass or sedge, nearly as large
as the nest of a Blackbird, lined with leaves of oak, beech or
other trees.
Aquatic invertebrates including caddis worms and insect larvae,
beetles, freshwater molluscs, and small fish.

From a perch it will walk into the water and deliberately
submerge, but there is no truth in the assertion that it can
defy the laws of specific gravity and walk along the bottom.
When entering the water it grips with its strong feet, but the
method of progression beneath the surface is by swimming,
using the wings effectively for flying under water. It holds
itself down by muscular exertion, with its head well down
and its body oblique, its course beneath the surface often
revealed by a line of rising bubbles.

Dark above and white-breasted.
18 cms

March-May 1-2 Broods
3-6 White
Voice: