Gannet
Fact File
Taken at Saltcoats on 1st October  2017 using Nikon D5200 with Sigma 600 mm zoom lens.




 


Hatchling
Taken at Bempton Cliffs on 18th July 2009 using Nikon D40X
with Nikon 300 mm zoom lens.
Fact File
Juvenile
Taken at Barns Ness on 2nd September 2012 using Panasonic Lumix LX5
with Leica 65 Televid spotting scope.
Fact File
 
Juvenile
Taken at Musselburgh on 24th September 2016 using
Nikon D5200
with Sigma 150-500 mm zoom lens.
Fact File
Immature adult.
Taken at Saltcoats on 31st May 2015 using Nikon D5200 with Sigma 150-500 mm zoom lens.
Fact File
Lunch
Taken at Saltcoats on 31st May 2015 using Nikon D5200
with Sigma 150-500 mm zoom lens.

Fact File
In Flight
Taken at Bempton Cliffs on 18th July 2009 using Nikon D40X with Nikon 300 mm zoom lens.
Fact File
 
Gannet.
Species:
Order:
Family:
Local Names:
Morus bassanus.
Pelecaniformes.
Sulidae.
Solan Goose
.

Site Of Nest:
Food:
Feature:











Plumage:






Length:
Wingspan:
Dense colonies on cliffs in a nest of seaweed or mud.
Fish and Squid.
Gannets hunt fish by diving from a height into the
sea and pursuing their prey underwater. Gannets
have a number of adaptations which enable them
to do this: they have no external nostrils; they have
air sacs in their face and chest under their skin
which act like bubble-wrap, cushioning the impact
with the water; their eyes are positioned far enough
forward on their face to give them binocular vision,
allowing them to judge distances accurately.
Gannets can dive from a height of 30 m, achieving
speeds of 100 km/h as they strike the water, enabling
them to catch fish much deeper than most airborne birds.
Mainly white bodies, with long, black-tipped wings.
Their heads are large, yellowish with black marks
around their eyes. They have straight, sharp, tapered
bills and pointed tails.
Young Gannets are completely black achieving a little
more white plumage each year until maturity in 3 to 4 years.

One bluish chalky egg
1 m
1.8 - 2.0 m

Voice: