Oystercatcher
Taken at Yellowcraigs on 16th February 2020 using Nikon D500 with 600 mm zoom lens Fact File

Taken at Traigh an Luig, Islay on 11th July 2017 using Nikon D5200 with Sigma 600 mm zoom lens. Fact File

Taken at Troon on 23rd October 2016 using Nikon D5200 with Sigma 600 mm Zoom lens.  Attached: Sigma 1401 Teleconvertor lens Fact File

Taken at Musselburgh on 25th April 2021 using Nikon D500 with 600 mm zoom lens. Fact File

Taken at Musselburgh on 25th October 2020 using Nikon D500 with 600 mm zoom lens. Fact File
Oystercatcher
Taken at Port Seton on 12th January 2020 using Nikon D500 with Sigma 600 mm zoom lens. Fact File

Lunch
Taken at Saltcoats on 19th January 2020 using Nikon D500 with Sigma 600 mm zoom lens.
Fact File

Taken at Musselburgh on 8th March 2018 using Nikon D5200 with Sigma 600 mm zoom lens. Fact File


 Oystercatcher.
Species :
Order:
Family:
Local names:
Haematopus ostralegus.
Charadriiformes.
Haematopodidae
Site Of Nest:
Materials:
Food:
Plumage:










Length:
Breeding Period:
Eggs:
On the coast or on inland gravelly islands.
None. Just a scrape on the ground.
Mussels and cockles on the coast; mainly worms inland.
Either all-black, or black (or dark brown) on top and
white underneath.  The bill shape varies; oystercatchers with broad bill
tips open molluscs by prising them apart or hammering through the shell, whereas pointed-bill birds dig up worms. Much of this is due to the wear resulting from feeding on the prey. Thus when birds move inland to breed and thus shift from feeding on molluscs to worms their bill
shape changes from flat to pointed.  Legs are Red.
White Collar: The white collar is quite complicated as seen in this Scientific report. It could be that the white collar prevents interaction between breeding and non-breeding birds when adults nest on the shore and share feeding grounds with summer immatures.
39-44 cm
Mid-April.
2 to 4 (but usually 3) cream eggs, spotted with brown.
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Voice