Sparrowhawk
Fact File
Taken at Lochwinnoch on 24th March 2016 using Nikon D5200
with Sigma 150-500mm zoom lens.




 

 
Juvenile
Taken at Baron's Haugh on 23rd March 2015 using Nikon D5200
with Sigma 150-500mm zoom lens.
Fact File
Juvenile
Taken at Baron's Haugh on 28th September 2015 using Nikon D5200
with Sigma 150-500mm zoom lens.
Fact File
In Flight
Taken at Haddington on 29th January 2017 using Nikon D5200
with Sigma 600 mm zoom lens.
Fact File

Sparrowhawk.
Species:
Order:
Family:
Local Names:
Accipiter nisus.
Falconiformes.
Accipitridae.

Site:
Materials:
Food:
Feature:



Plumage:

Length:
Wingspan:
Length:
Wingspan:

Eggs:
Woodland
Twigs to build nest 2.0 feet across.
Smaller woodland birds.
Females can be up to 25% larger than males and weigh up to twice as much. When females are larger than males, it is known as reverse sexual dimorphism; this is unusual in higher vertebrates but typical in birds of prey,and most marked in birds of prey which hunt birds.
Male:slate-grey upperparts with finely red-barred underparts.
Female: greyish-brown upperparts, and brown-barred underparts.
Male: 29–34 cm.
Male: 59–64 cm.
Female: 35–41 cm.
Female:
67–80 cm .
4 - 5 pale blue, brown-spotted.
Voice: