Yarrow
Fact File
Taken at Musselburgh on 7th October 2018 using Nikon D500
with Sigma 600 mm zoom lens.




 


Taken at Hogganfield Loch on 16th July 2015 with Panasonic Lumix LX5
in macro mode.
Fact File

Taken
at Skateraw on 18th November 2018 using Nikon D500
with Sigma 600 mm zoom lens
 Fact File

Taken at White Sands on 25th June 2017 with Panasonic Lumix LX5
in macro mode.
Fact File

Yarrow.
Latin Name :
Family:
Habit:
AKA:
Achillea millefolium.
Asteraceae
Herbaceous perennial.
Nosebleed plant, old man's pepper,
devil's nettle, sanguinary, milfoil,
soldier's woundwort.
Habitat:
Height:
Flowers:
Feature:

Disturbed soil of grasslands and open forests.
0.2 - 1 mtr.
May - June. Pink or White flowers.
Can be confused with spotted parsley, spotted cowbane
which are highly poisenous.

The herb is purported to be a diaphoretic, astringent,
tonic, stimulant and mild aromatic. It contains isovaleric
acid, salicylic acid, asparagin, sterols, flavonoids, bitters,
tannins, and coumarins. The plant also has a long history
as a powerful 'healing herb' used topically for wounds, cuts
and abrasions. The genus name Achillea is derived from
mythical Greek character, Achilles, who reportedly carried it
with his army to treat battle wounds. This medicinal action is
also reflected in some of the common names mentioned above,
such as staunchweed and soldier's woundwort.
The dark blue essential oil, extracted by steam
distillation of the flowers, is generally used as an
anti-inflammatory or in chest rubs for colds and influenza.